Credit is generally given to the artist Andy Warhol for popularising modern screen printing as an artistic technique, identified as serigraphy, in the United States. Warhol was supported in his production by master screen printer Michel Caza, a founding member of Fespa, and is particularly identified with his 1962 depiction of actress Marilyn Monroe, known as the Marilyn Diptych, screen printed in garish colours.

Sister Mary Corita Kent, gained international fame for her vibrant serigraphs during the 1960s and 1970s. Her works were rainbow colored, contained words that were both political and fostered peace and love and caring.

American entrepreneur, artist and inventor Michael Vasilantone started to use, develop, and sell a rotatable multicolour garment screen printing machine in 1960. Vasilantone later filed for patent on his invention in 1967 granted number 3,427,964 on February 18, 1969. The original machine was manufactured to print logos and team information on bowlinggarments but soon directed to the new fad of printing on T-shirts. The Vasilantone patent was licensed by multiple manufacturers, the resulting production and boom in printed T-shirts made this garment screen printing machine popular. Screen printing on garments currently accounts for over half of the screen printing activity in the United States.

Graphic screenprinting is widely used today to create mass or large batch produced graphics, such as posters or display stands. Full colour prints can be created by printing in CMYK(cyan, magenta, yellow and black ('key')).

Screen printing lends itself well to printing on canvas. Andy WarholArthur OkamuraRobert RauschenbergRoy LichtensteinHarry Gottlieb and many other artists have used screen printing as an expression of creativity and artistic vision.

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